Menu

Gasho Yamamura

Categories
  • Nessuna categoria

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS, ph. GASHO YAMAMURA / ⬇︎

_Gasho Yamamura was born in Osaka in 1939. His family moved to Kanda in Tokyo soon after he was born. Since then, he spent his childhood and youth in Kanda-Sudacho. After graduating from Kanda-Awaji elementary school in 1952, he entered Tamagawa Gakuen Junior High School. While in junior high school, he started taking photographs for the first time. He contributed his photographs to Sankei Camera while in high school. In 1958 he entered Nihon University College of Art Department of Photography. Thereafter he won many prizes such as the Best Monthly Photo of the Year from Camera Mainichi, a special commendation at Gekkou Photo Contest, and a bronze prize at Fuji Photo Contest. In 1959 he began shooting portraits of foreigners (American GQ families) in Washington Heights. In 1960 after graduating in the photography department of Nihon University, he won a special commendation at All Japan Student Photo Contest and he became a member of the Japan Photographers Society. In 1963 he exhibited his work in Exhibitions of Contemporary Photography held at the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo. In 1967 he held his first one-man show ‘Ogori eno Taikan’ (‘Crowned Extravagance’) at Muramatsu gallery in Ginza. In 1968 he participated to the Ninth World Festival of Youth and Students. From 1974, he began shooting plants, and in 1976 held his second solo exhibition “Shokubutsu-ni” (“The Plants”) at Nikon Salon. During the same year, he published the photo book “Shokubutsu-ni” (“The Plants”, TB Design Institutes) and received the First Nobuo Ina Award. In 1977 he held his third solo exhibition “For Plants II” at Nikon Salon. In 1979 he exhibited his photos at ICP “Japan: A Self-Portrait” in Venice. In 1982, his fourth solo exhibition “Shokubutsu-sai” (“Plants Festival”) was held at Nikon Salon. Later on, he exhibited at “Flash Photography” in London as well. In 1984 he exhibited at “FOTO84” in Amsterdam. In 1985 he became a judge for Nihon Camera. In 1986 he was in charge of a judge at the Niigata Art Exhibition. On February 28th, 1987 he suddenly died, while preparing the publication of his photo book “Hana-gari”. In the following year, 1988, “Hana-gari”, was completed (published by Advertise Communication) and the memorial exhibition “Soshite-Hanagari” was held at Nikon Salon. In 1990, the “ Gasho Yamamura Photo Exhibition” was held at GIP TOKYO as well as in South Korea. In 1990, a selection of previous works was published with the title: “Monochrome-Works of Gasho Yamamura” (by Mitsumura Printing Company).text by Hosoya Yusaku (translated by Hanajima Yuko)© Twodogs Worldwide Photography Magazine_WASHINGTON HEIGHTSWashington Heights was an US dependent housing area that existed in the center of Tokyo from 1947 until 1963-5. The total site was approximately 914,000 square meters. It covered current Yoyogi Park, NHK Broadcasting Center, Yoyogi National Stadium, and was like America within Japan. Soon after the war, the GHQ (General Headquarters), led by Douglas MacArthur , requisitioned the Yoyogi drill ground of the Japanese Imperial Army and built a just-like American township for the occupation forces and their families. This housing annex provided 827 one ~ two storied prefabricated houses, kindergartens, elementary and junior high schools, churches, theaters, nightclubs, clinics, swimming pools, tennis courts, baseball grounds, PX (mini-market with American products), substations, fire stations, filling stations and etc. Every house was equipped with tableware and proper kitchen tools, and US soldier’s families could start their life in Japan simply with a couple of personal belongings. Children werefrolicking on lush green lawn and in these white residences housewives could enjoy cooking in modern kitchens outfitted with refrigerators. Washington Heights appeared out of the blue among the burnt-out ruins of Tokyo. And the resident seemed tolive in an American TV-drama. It was a forbidden world, and Japanese people were never allowed to step into this area. At that time Japanese people were in extreme poverty and able to observe American people’s life only from outside. Americanization became the imminent hope for Japanese people in Tokyo, and the predisposition towards American values of life was gradually shaped around Washington Heights. After the 1960 protests against the US-Japan Security Treaty, the US government determined to take down this whole area in central Tokyo. Later on, during the Tokyo Olympic games the same site was used as athlete’s village, and Washington Heights disappeared completely. Today, only one house that was used by a Dutch athlete during the Olympic games, is still standing in Yoyogi Park. text by Satoko Akio (translated by Hanajima Yuko)© Twodogs Worldwide Photography Magazine_THE SHARP EYE OF THE CAMERAAs the mechanism of cameras has remarkably evolved today, there is a flood of any imaginable photographic image around us. All these images penetrate deeply our life and right away represent and remind us all kinds of phenomenon and realities of the world. In this mass-productive age, I am recently questioning myself if a photographer is supposed to produce images simply because he owns a camera, and weather he is supposed to press the shutter as it has always been since the beginning of photography? Is it acceptable that a photographer is turning his camera towards reality in a passive way, getting lost in the trend of time? Certainly, taking a photograph is one way to freeze complex and plentiful realities in a single moment. Therefore, I perceive that a photographer has always to challenge and deal with the reality that keeps flowing out continuously. When a photographer takes a portrait, he should penetrate into the inner world of human beings, aiming to reveal the entire personality of a person instead of being a passive observer. Photography may well be described as the human conflict between a photographer and his subject, and when a photographer presses the shutter at one thousandth of a second, he aims to produce truly new images. However, shooting at the speed of one thousandth of a second isn’t just a matter of exposure time, or of recording a subject with the fastest possible shutter speed, but is rather a question of how the camera’s eyes are confronting reality and capturing a shutter chance, straining the eyes with extreme speed. If not, photography would be just a list of factual images, recorded without any mature consideration. Therefore, the real quality of a subject matters opens up when a photographer approaches his subject with strained eyes, and is able to fix at a shutter speed of one thousandth of a second, in a single instant, a story superior to the image itself. We get deeply impressed by a photograph when is able to capture the true nature of a subject and consequently speaks powerfully to the audience. I assume that the philosophy and creativity of photography can be conceived in this way.text by Yamamura Gasho (translated by Hanajima Yuko)© Twodogs Worldwide Photography Magazine_MASKS AND CHILDRENThe mask image always involves something metaphysical and has a mysterious atmosphere for all of us, including children. In the world of adults, beyond the act of wearing a mask, there is a psychological element of clowning and fabricating a personage. I had the same impression when I was photographing children in a military base, and when they were wearing masks, I could perceive a complex side of their character. Looking at them dressed in a mask, I conceived that exist a universe of masked children, with an independent ego, detached from the real world. When the mask was on, all their innocence completely disappeared from their eyes, and I felt judged coldly with an incredulous and keen gaze. These masked children seemed to stare at our world of adults as if we were all caricatures. The strong impact of this experience guided me to the conclusion of the work with the masked children and became a departure point for my career. Regarding the technical aspects, I used a standard lens and a super-wide-angle-lens to create a strong impact and emphasize the unique expression of the masks and the children. About the processing, I duplicated the SSS negative on Lith film aiming to highlight the image contrast and the hard tones.text by Yamamura Gasho (translated by Hanajima Yuko)

© Twodogs Worldwide Photography Magazine

_BLACK SEEDSIn the human world, the white and black race ironically coexists in contrast. This disparity started since the white and black seeds were sowed into the earth, and the fatal tragedy for the black race began, as if it was a mischief of God. For several years, the black race was named ‘Negro’ and suffered racial discontent and inferiority against the white race. Even though the black race is today emancipated, racial discrimination still exists and black people shall never forget being black seeds. This tragic drama shall continue eternally. I’ve been taking many photos of black people, and it occurred simply, just because these black seeds lived in one area where for two years I was always photographing. Every time I looked into myself, an image of a black seed appeared. May be because my secret frustration and inferiority complex came out as a form of resistance, and was transformed into a photograph. In this work, I expressed in an extreme modern way the image of the black seed that I’ve always pursued. The extreme contrast and the rough quality of Fith film symbolically underscored the black seeds’ energetic scent, and I was pleased by this result.text by Yamamura Gasho (translated by Hanajima Yuko)

© Twodogs Worldwide Photography Magazine

_INTERVIEW 2012

Interview to Chie Yamamura – (Gasho Yamamura’s wife), by Y.Hosoya & L.PellegattaH: First, Gasho Yamamura was born in Osaka, wasn’t he?

Y: Yes. He was born there. But he moved to Kanda when he was a baby because of his father’s job. His father was working in the field of medical equipment. Later, he entered Tamagawa Gakuen junior high school.

H: Did he start taking photographs around that time?

Y: Yes. I think he started photographing in the latter half of junior-high, when he was fourteen or fifteen years old. In high school, he was already photographing seriously.

H: Did some one, like his parents for instance, influence him?

Y: Nobody. I didn’t really know how he got interested in photography. He applied to many photo contests around that time. Actually, he wanted to enter Waseda University Art School, but he failed the examination. So he entered Nihon University’s Art Department. At that time he was regularly showing his works in “Camera Mainichi”. Shouji Yamagishi, the chief editor, treated him with much kindness. Yamamura often showed him his works, and he received various prizes from “Camera Mainichi”. He began visiting Washington Heights around that time.

H: According to the chronological table, seems that he began shooting the “Washington Heights no Kodomo-tachi”(Washington Heights’s Children) series, when he was twenty years old. That was around 1960 and there were many ideal subjects, such as the 1960 protests against the US-Japan Security. Did Yamamura intend to take documentary photographs like Kazuo Kitai, for instance?

Y: Tadao Mitome, who was on good terms with him, did proceed in that direction. But in Yamamura’s case, his professor suggested him to shoot women. He wasn’t interested in that at all; and just later on he photographed some female nude in “Heibon Punch”.

L: Can you tell us what Yamamura was like? Was he naive or shy?

Y: I thought he was an ordinary man, but people around him used to say he was unique. He was quite a different parson when he was taking photos. He barged in, saying excuse me, and started shooting photos all at once. That’s a photographer, isn’t it? He wasn’t particularly quaint. He was a bit shy, and certainly had a sense of humor. He also had delicate health, and his mother brought him up with great care.

H: In the first place, what made him interested in Washington Heights?

Y: He visited his friend’s brother who was working in Washington Heights and then thought that it was an interesting subject.

H: Washington Heights was made in 1946 and in the beginning, was a very closed area where only white people were living. But in Yamamura’s photographs, there are many black people. In a way, his work shows that black people’s families moved to live in Washington Heights much later. Around that time, it was easier to enter this area.

Y: He used to give photographs of children to their families. They were simply happy to have them. When children asked him for a photo, he gave them one too. Then children introduced him to everyone around, saying Yamamura was a friend. That’s how he became friends with the people in Washington Heights. That was a strategy as well, making it easier to take photographs.

H: That’s the reason why the same person often appears in his photographs.L: Was Yamamura able to speak English?

Y: He did graduate from university, so he was able to communicate with broken English. It was easier as well because he was dealing with children, and using the camera as a communication tool. After photographing, he showed the children their prints, and they were very happy; plus naturally they got used to being photographed. As time went by, he became intimate with their parents as well.

H: It seems like he thoroughly excluded adults in “Washington Heights no Kodomo-tachi”.

Y: There are only a few adults’ photographs of black men. Kenzaburo Oe once contacted Yamamura, asking for an interesting photograph for the cover of his book ”Shiiku”(“Prize Stock”). But finally Oe decided not to use any of them, as the images were too particular.

H: In the “Washington Heights no Kodomo-tachi” series, it seems like Yamamura was photographing children with pure feelings. But later, on, he got interested in mechanical techniques more and more, and he began using strobe lighting in “Shokubutsu-ni”.

Y: It’s not only about mechanical and technical issues. The photographs in “Shokubutsu-ni” series were calculated and thought out. Otherwise, it wouldn’t have been possible to capture such images. But he wasn’t overly concerned about technical aspects. However, he was good at transforming a moment of reality into photography.

H: That makes sense. After he made “Shokubutsu-ni” in black & white, he tried in color. That was a simple leap. Was “Hana-gari” the last work of Gasho Yamamura?

Y: I should say it was. After the series of “Hana-gari”, he was shooting power cables and utility poles in black & white. It seemed like he was looking for the next subject.

H: After all, he returned to “Washington Heights no Kodomo-tachi”, a series from more than twenty years before and started reprinting it. Have you ever asked him what was the reason?

Y: No, I’ve never asked him because he was confused about many things at that time. He was looking at his negatives and confronting himself going back to the starting point, in a process of trial and error, to find out what he was going to do next. I don’t really understand if there was any particular reason.

H: Do you think “Hana-gari”, the color photography of the plants, was a conclusion for Gasho Yamamura?

Y: Nobody can hit home runs all the time. He didn’t want to take any photographs he wasn’t confident about. With “Shokubutsu-ni”, he made a splendid debut receiving the “Nobuo Ina Award”, and since then, he could never be satisfied unless he took better photographs than that. He didn’t want to introduce any incomplete work to the public.

H: Do you think he intended to reprint and collect works from “Washington Heights no Kodomo-tach” to make a book in his lifetime?

Y: I don’t think so. I think he was simply reprinting photographs with a pure emotion.

H: Did he have any political interest? Did he have any particular philosophy?

Y: He didn’t have any interest in politics. He simply had a passion for photography. And he liked movies as well. When he saw “Easy Rider”, he came back home and was very impressed. He also liked Tarkovsky’s films. He even liked Nikkatsu Roman Porno. He saw “ Sailor Suit and Machine Gun” with our daughter too. Going to the cinema was a special occasion in those days. He saw all kinds of movies and enjoyed discovering different ways of expression. Later, he became good friends with Kazuo Kamimura, the author of “Dousei-Jidai”.

H: It seems he had a large circle of friends. Among photographers, Hajime Sawatari was one of his close friends.

Y: Well, Ikko Narahara treated him with kindness, also Jun Morinaga and Jun Miki. Kiyoshi Suzuki often sent him letters. Kishin Shinoyama was one year younger than him and they knew each other as amazing photographers.

L: By the way, why did he get interested in plants all of a sudden?

Y: Well… Perhaps he came upon the subject when he was searching for new subjects. He didn’t use a strobe light when he began photographing plants. Accidentally, he happened to use a strobe light and got an inspiration. It was possible that he was inspired by something like animality that plants might have. They are very sensual and lively, aren’t they?

H: In that sense, the advice to be a photographer of female nudes wasn’t so bad.

Y: Have you ever seen such photographs of plants? It seems that they were captured as something sensual. It is possible that he was attracted by this element. I wonder if there might be any connection between the photographs of plants and of Washington Heights. This liveliness of plants may have something to do with the reason why black children attracted him. Whether he was conscious of it or not, in the process of reprinting “Washington Heights no Kodomo-tachi” series, Yamamura was questioning himself about what he was looking at in the past and in the present at that time. That’s the reason why he reprinted the same photos so many times. Although it doesn’t sound new anymore, he was also attempting to explore the artistic possibilities of black and white photography.

H: On that point, there is “basso-continuo” which connects between “Shokubutsu-ni” and “Washington Heights no Kodomo-tachi”.

Y: But they looked very different when they came out.

L: Both photos of children and plants look very natural and pure. I don’t know any other photographer who used strobe lights to take photos of plants. I imagine that he took photos in “Shokubutsu-ni” as if he was taking portraits of people.

Y: Children look innocent, but in reality that’s not always true. In “Washington Heights no Kodomo-tachi”, some of the children look devious and frightening, and also the plants look not only beautiful but thorny and prickly.

L: Both plants and children have their own individuality, and individuality is real beauty.

Y: well, in Yamamura’s case, he captures unexpected beauty, which is different from the typical kind.

H: It was probably the time when western aesthetics in photography penetrated into Japan. I’m sure that he saw the exhibition “The Family of Man”, curated by Edward Steichen, and knew Diane Arbus’s work as well. Seeing these internationally praised works, he tried to perceive this western approach and respond esthetically as a Japanese photographer.L: Yamamura was interacting with the world, using the camera as a tool and playing with children and plants.H: I agree. I perceive that when a portrait is taken, the camera transforms itself into a political device. The subject fears that the camera may steal an unknown image of himself and the photographer feels this tension through the glance of his viewer… In a way this is a matter of power and balance. But with children… L: …Children are totally free from this annoying power relationship. We can imagine that Yamamura was one of those children. By taking photos, he was playing with them, portraying them from within rather then from an external point of view. There are no boundaries, and the portraits look very strange and particular. Although Washington Heights was an exceptionally closed area in Tokyo, he took these photos as if he was a resident.H: I think so too. Yamamura didn’t photograph almost any cityscape in Washington Heights, even though it was a great chance to record such a secret area. After all, he was a photographer without any political intent.L: It is interesting that he photographed only children. And another interesting thing is the presence of the Halloween masks. Usually people wear masks to hide their personality, but in Yamamura’s photographs the mask seems to reveal even more the true character of each child. He successfully captures the human nature and the social habits beyond the camouflage. The mask transforms itself into a mirror, reflecting the real drama and comedy of life. That is impressive!

 

GASHO YAMAMURA JP

鋭いカメラ・アイで  カメラ・メカニズムのめざましい進歩とともに、今日われわれの周囲にはありとあらゆる写真がはんらんしている。たしかに写真はわれわれの生活の内部にまではいり込み、世界のさまざまな現象や事実をインスタントに運んできてくれ、事実への関心をいやが上にも提起してくれる。  しかし、このように量産される時代の中で、立ち場の逆なわれわれ写真制作側は、ただ安閑と「写真は写るから、写しています」といった、写真発生時代と同様な単純な姿勢でシャッターを押しつつあるのではないだろうか。写真の需要が盛んな時代だから、その時代の波に写真家は埋没してしまって、受け身の状態でこの現実にレンズを向けてはいまいか。最近私はそんな問いを自分自身に発している。  たしかに写真は、現実という複雑怪奇で豊富な内容を、ある一定の瞬間に湖底する唯一の表現手段である。だから写真家は、つぎからつぎへと流失して行くこの現実を向こうにまわして、いつもアクチュアルに勝負をいどんでいなければならないのである。人間の顔一つをとるにしても、その人物に対して写真家は受動的な傍観者ではなくその人間の内面に自分自身を積極的にはいり込ませなければすみずみまで見通すことはできない。とられる対象と写真家のレンズの目があの限られたわくの中で衝突する場において、真の新しい映像が生まれるのである。つまり写真を写すこと自体は、とる者ととられるものとの人間的かっとうにほかならず、その瞬間に写真家は1/1000秒でシャッターを切るのだ。  私がここでいう1/1000秒のシャッターとは、何も常にカメラの最高スピード・シャッターであらゆるものを写す、いわゆる露出の問題をいうのではない。千分の一秒というギリギリのシャッター・チャンスの目をもってこの現実と対決しなければならぬカメラ・アイが問題なのである。視覚の緊張がゆるんでいては不注意になり、それは単なる事実の羅列か現実の安易な定着でしかあり得ない。  1/1000秒という視覚の緊張で対象にアプローチすることによってもの(対象)の本質を追求する道が開くのである。そこにこそ、写真のテーマ性が確立し、画面の物語りをはるかに超越したものが生まれてくるのだ。われわれが一枚の写真を見て深く感動する時は、おそらくこの瞬間ではないだろうか。それは写真の映像が対象の真の姿をとらえたものであると同時に、記録された映像自体が、見る者に雄弁に語りかけてくる時なのである。写真の思想とか創造とかいわれるものは、その接点で伝達され得るものと私は信じている。 仮面と子ども 「仮面」のイメージというものは、子どもの世界に限らず、常に私たちの間でも何か暗示的で不思議なムードを秘めている。大人の世界で日常「仮面」をつける行為の裏には、道化や虚構の心理が働いていると思う。私がここでとらえた基地の中の子どもたちにも、そんなものが感じられて、つくづくと子どもの世界の複雑な一面を知ることができた。  仮面をつけた子どもたちを凝視していると、この現実から離脱した〈ひとつのエゴ〉を持った子どもだけの仮面の世界があるような気がする。そこでは、あのあどけない子どものひとみはまったく消え失せ、うたがいぶかい鋭い目を持って私たちをつめたく批判している。  それはあたかも、子どもが仮面の世界から私たちをカリカチュアしているように見受けられる。仮面の子どものそんな強い異様な印象が、私自身をしてこの作品をまとめる出発点となった。  表現技術に関して、私なりに感じた「仮面と子ども」の特異な印象を強調づけるためにも、撮影にはモチーフに対して超広角レンズの使用と、標準レンズでインパクトした。撮影後の処理では、SSSフィルムで普通撮影したネガをリス・フィルムにデューブして、このフィルム特有のハード・トーンを主体として強く表現してみた。 黒い種子  この地球上の人間世界に、おなじ人間として存在しながら、なぜか白色人種と黒色人種が皮肉な対比で共存させられてしまった。それは無意味に、白い種子と黒い種子の二粒の種子が地球に落されたことから始まるのであり、なんの理由もなく、神のいたずらのように、黒い種子が蒔かれたときに、黒人という人種のごく宿命的悲劇がはじまるのである。単に皮膚が黒いというだけで、彼らは黒人とかニグロとか呼ばれて長年にわたり白人に対してつねに人種的不満と劣等感をいだかされてきた。  黒人が解放された今日でもなお人種的偏見はのこり、彼ら黒人たちにとっては、自身が黒い種子であることを決してわすれることができないであろう。そして、悲惨なドラマは永久につづくことであろう。  ぼくはある所で、この二年間というものを終始、黒人を追いつづけてきた。というのは、その場所に黒人が〈いた〉からであり、黒い種子がそこに〈あった〉からである。追求のほこさきがぼく自身の内面にむけられるとき、いつもそこに黒い種子のイメージが存在していたのである。  おそらく、ぼくという人間の内部にひそむ欲求不満と劣等意識が、黒人が白人にむけるような一つのレジスタンスとなって現われ、それが映像に還元されたのかも知れない。  この作品も、日頃、ぼくが自分自身に対して追求していた黒い種子のイメージをウルトラ・モダーンに表現してみた。リスフィルムによる極端なトーンと粒子の荒れが、黒い種子のあのエネルギッシュな体臭をやや象徴的に表出してくれたことは、ぼくのイメージを満足させてくれたといえば過言であろうか。

text by GASHO YAMAMURA (translated by Hanajima Yuko)

© Twodogs Worldwide Photography Magazine

_INTERVIEW 2012 JP

 

Chie Yamamura (L.Pellegatta ©)H まず、山村雅昭さんは大阪生まれでしたよね。Y ほんとに、生まれただけね。赤ちゃんのときに神田に来たの。父親が医療器具まわりの仕事をしていて、その関係でね。中学から玉川学園に通いはじめました。H そのころからカメラを?Y そうね、中学の後半くらいからじゃないかな。十四、五くらいのとき。高校生になってからは、もう本格的に撮りはじめてた。H 誰かの影響とかあったんでしょうか。たとえばご両親とか。Y ぜんぜん関係ないですよ。でも、なぜカメラをもつようになったかは私もわからない。いろいろなコンテストに応募をはじめたのもそのころ。高校を卒業して、ほんとうは早稲田の美術に行きたかったんだけど、落ちちゃった。それで、日芸の写真学科に入ったの。そのころにはすでに、『カメラ毎日』なんかの常連になってた。山岸章二さんが編集長で、彼にすごくかわいがってもらってました。プリントを持っていっては見てもらったり、いろんな賞をもらったりして。ワシントンハイツへも、だいたいそのころに出入りをはじめたんでしょうね。H 年表を見ると、「ワシントンハイツの子供たち」を撮り始めたのは二〇歳からということになってますね。ちょうど一九六〇年前後でしょう? 安保闘争とか、ある意味では撮影するのに絶好の対象があった時代ですよね。たとえば北井一夫さんがそうだったように、山村雅昭さんにもドキュメンタリー写真を撮ろうとする意図があったんでしょうか。Y 彼と仲のよかった三留理男さんは、そっちに進みましたよね。でも山村は、大学に行っていたころ、先生に「女性を撮ったらいい」と言われたみたいよ。「ぼくはいやだ」って反対して、ぜんぜんその気はなかったらしいけど。ただ後々に『平凡パンチ』とかの仕事のなかでヌードなんかは撮っています。L 山村さんはどんな人だった? ナイーヴな人とか、シャイな人とか……Y わたしはふつうだと思うんだけどね、周りは変わってるって言ってた。写真を撮るときはもちろん別人の顔ね。ずかずかっと入っていって、ちょっとちょっと、って言ってるあいだにもうはじめちゃってる。でも写真家ってそういうものでしょう? 特別変わってるってわけではなかった。たしかに、ちょっとシャイな部分はあったかもしれないけど。それに、ユーモアのある人だった。あとは、ちょっと体が弱かったわね。だからお母さんがすごく大事に育てたみたい。H そもそも、なんでワシントンハイツに興味をもったんでしょうね。Y たぶん、お友達の兄弟かなんかが、ワシントンハイツで仕事してたんでしょう。それで、ちょっと遊びにいったときに、これだ!と思ったのかもしれない。H ワシントンハイツができたのは一九四六年ですけど、当初はすごくクローズな空間だったようです。想像にかたくないですが、それこそ白人ばっかりで……。でも山村さんの写真は、黒人もたくさん出てきますよね。黒人の家族がワシントンハイツに居住をはじめるのは遅かったようですから、山村さんの写真はそのことを証言するものでもありますね。ある意味、ハイツの中に、入りやすかった時期なのかもしれない。 Y それに、子供を撮った写真を、その家族にあげてたりしてたの。それって単純にうれしいじゃない?子供が「ちょうだい」って言えば、その子にもあげたりして。そうすると、「山村はぼくの友達だ」って、まわりに紹介して、どんどん仲良しになっていった。彼なりの戦略でもあったんでしょうね。友達になれば、撮りやすいから。H 同じ人物がたびたび登場するのも、そういうことでしょうね。L 山村さんは、英語は話せたの?Y いちおう大学も出てるから、からっきしダメってわけでもなかった。ブロークンでしょうけど……。相手が子供だったり、コミュニケーションの手段がカメラだったりしたのも、よかったみたいね。写真を撮って、プリントを見せれば、それで子供はよろこぶんだから。自然に馴れてゆくし、その家族とも仲良しになってゆくでしょう。H 「ワシントンハイツの子供たち」からは、大人は、徹底して排除されてますね。Y ちょっとだけ、あるんですよ。黒人の男性を撮ったのとか。大江健三郎さんから『飼育』用の写真にいいのがないかってうちにも連絡がきたことがあるんだけど、結局使われなかった。シンプルなのがなかったから。H 「ワシントンハイツの子供たち」シリーズで、〈子供を撮る〉っていう無邪気なところからスタートして、どんどんメカニックな方向へ興味が発展している気がするんです。そして「植物に」でストロボを使いはじめた。Y でも、機械的なこととか、テクニックだけじゃないのよね。「植物に」は、特に計算づくの、考え抜かれた写真だと思うし、そうでなければあんなイメージは獲得できなかったと思うんだけど、その他は必ずしも技術的なことに必要以上の配慮をしていたわけじゃなかった。それよりも、自分の目でもって目の当たりにした現実の一瞬を写真に置き換える感性に長けていた、というのが大きいんじゃないかしら。H なるほど。それから、モノクロで「植物に」ができたから、「花狩」はカラーでやってみようと。それはシンプルな飛躍かもしれませんね。山村雅昭さんの仕事としては、「花狩」が最後になるんでしょうか。Y 一応、そういうことになるわね。「花狩」以後も、高圧線とか電柱とか、そういうものはモノクロで撮ってましたけどね。まるで何を撮るべきか模索するかのような感じでした。H そしてそのあとに、二〇年以上も前の「ワシントンハイツの子供たち」へ、戻っていった。ふたたびプリントを焼く、という回帰の仕方で。その理由を本人に聞かれたことはありますか?Y いや、聞かなかったです。いろいろ迷ってる時だったからね。次に何をやろうかな、という試行錯誤のプロセスの中で、まずは原点回帰ということでネガと向き合っていたみたい。だから、特別な意味があったかどうかは、わからない。H カラーの植物写真=「花狩」というのが、やっぱり山村雅昭にとってのひとつの終着点だったんでしょうか。Y そんなにいつもホームランばっかり打てないでしょう。だから、本人は、納得できない写真は撮りたくなかった気持ちがあったみたい。「植物に」で、伊奈信男賞を撮ったでしょう? そのデビューの仕方が華々しかったから、それ以上のものを撮らないことには、気が済まなかっただろうし、いい加減な作品を世に出したくなかったんでしょう。H 「ワシントンハイツの子供たち」をひたすら焼き増しして、それを書物にまとめるという意図は生前お持ちでなかったんでしょうか。Y そういうつもりはなかったでしょうね。ただ純粋な気持ちで、プリントを焼いていただけだと思う。H 政治的な関心は、なにかお持ちだったんでしょうか。そういったものへ積極的に関わりたいとか、ある特定の思想をお持ちだったとか……。Y 別になかったです。単純に、写真に対する情熱しかなかったと思う。それから、やたら映画が好きで、よく見てたわ。『イージーライダー』を見たときも感動して帰ってきたし、タルコフスキーも大好きだったし、あるいは日活ロマンポルノがいい、なんて言ってたときもあったし。娘といっしょに『セーラー服と機関銃』なんかも見たりして。映画はなんでも見てたわね。映画を見るということが、ひとつのステータスにもなりえた時代でもあった。それに、自分とはちがう表現の仕方が、スクリーンにはあるでしょう?それを発見することのよろこびがあったんでしょう。ジャンルを問わず、なんでも見てたわ。『同棲時代』の上村一夫さんなんかとも仲良しになったりして。H 交友関係は広かったようですね。写真家でいえば、それこそ沢渡朔さんをはじめとして……。Y そうね、奈良原一高先生もかわいがってくださったし、森永純さん、三木淳さん、などなど。鈴木清さんはお手紙をくださったりして。篠山紀信さんは、一年後輩だったんだけど、すごい写真家がいるぞ、と学生のときから名前くらいは互いに知っていたみたい。L ところで、なんでとつぜん植物に興味をもったんだろう?Y さあねえ……いろいろ素材を捜しているうちに、見つけたのかもしれない。本人も説明できないんじゃないかな。最初に植物を撮りはじめたころは、ストロボを使ってなかったと思う。でも、たまたまフラッシュを焚いてみたら、ピンときたのかもしれない。もしかしたら、植物がもっている動物性みたいなものに、やられちゃった可能性もあるわね。すごく肉感のあって、生々しいでしょう。H そういう意味では、「女性カメラマンになれ」っていう指導も、間違いじゃなかったかもしれないですね。 Y あんな植物の写真なんて、ほかに見たことないでしょう。植物を、セクシャルなものとして捉えてるような感じすらして。そういう部分に惹かれた可能性はあるわね。だから、飛躍するけど、もしかしたら、黒人の子供たちに興味を持ったという事実にも、関連するところがあるのかもしれない。意識したか意識しなかったかわからないけど、「ワシントンハイツの子供たち」を晩年に焼き直す過程で、自分が何を見てきたのか、またいまは何を見ているのかを、山村雅昭は問い続けていたんでしょうね。同じプリントがあんなにたくさんあるのも、きっとそういうこと。それともうひとつ、モノクロ写真こそ写真を芸術まで昇華させることができるのだ、という意識があったんじゃないか。いまでこそ、時代錯誤かもしれないけど……。H その点でいえば、「植物に」と「ワシントンハイツの子供たち」には、通奏低音のようなものがあって、それが両者のあいだを繋いでいるとも言えるでしょうね。Y できあがったものは、一見すると違うけどね。L 子供たちの写真は、とてもナチュラルで、純粋だよね。たとえば植物のように。それに、植物の写真にストロボを使った写真家なんて、ぼくは他に知らない。ストロボは、ふつうポートレイトを撮影するときに使うものだ。だから「植物に」は人間を撮っている感覚があったんじゃないかな。そのあたりに、ぼくは両者のあいだの共通点を感じてる。Y 子供はピュアな存在みたいに見られがちだけど、実際そうとも言い切れない部分があるわよね。「ワシントンハイツの子供たち」を見ても、ずる賢そうな表情があったり、恐ろしげだったり。植物も同じで、ただきれいなだけじゃない。とげとげしい植物だってある。L 植物にも子供にも、それぞれに個性があるからね。美とは個性なんだ。Y 美は美なんだけど、山村雅昭のばあいは、普遍的に捉えられるような美じゃない。ごく当たり前な美とはちがう。H 時代的には、写真における西洋的な美意識が、日本に浸透していったころだと思うんです。エドワード・スタイケンが企画した展覧会「人間家族」も、当然、見ているだろうし。ダイアン・アーバスの存在だって、そのころから知ってたんじゃないのかな。世界が賞賛する写真を目の当たりにして、それらとどう接触し、距離をとって、美学的に反抗するのか、という意識もあったんじゃないでしょうか。日本人写真家のひとりとして……。L 山村雅昭は、世界と対話していたんだと思う。子供たちや植物と、カメラという言語を使って。H そうだね。ポートレイトを撮るとき、カメラはとても政治的な装置になっちゃう。撮られる側からすれば、自分の知らない自分のイメージが奪われてしまうという点において恐怖を感じるだろうし、撮る側もまた、見つめ返されることへの緊張がある。ふたつの視線がすごく強力に対決する場だ。力の問題、権力の問題、ヴァランスの問題が、そこにはある。でも子供に関しては……。L そういう煩わしい力関係から、自由だよね。変な顔をしてみたり、素直に笑ってみせたりして。遊び心があって、まるで子供たちとゲームをしているみたいだ。あるいは山村雅昭という写真家もまた、写真を撮っているあいだは、ひとりの子供になろうとしていたのかもしれない。外側からではなくて、内側から写真を撮っている。だから撮影者と被写体とのあいだに境界線が感じられない。すごくふしぎなポートレイトだ。それに、ワシントンハイツは、東京のなかでも特別に閉鎖的な空間だったのに、彼は初めからそこに暮らしていた住人のような感じで撮っている。H ぼくもそう思う。ワシントンハイツという街の、風景らしきものをほとんど撮ってないね。ある意味では秘密の場所だから、いったんそこに入りこんだなら、街の様子を記録してもよさそうだけど。そういう意味では、やっぱり彼は政治的な意図をほとんど持たなかった写真家だったのかもしれない。L 子供だけしか撮らなかった、というのがおもしろいね。あとは、仮面の存在感だ。ふだんは、ほんとうの自分を知られないように、人は仮面をつけている。でも彼の写真で見る仮面は、むしろ子供の本性を暴露しようとするかのようだ。ただのカーニヴァルの仮面とは思えない。仮面を越えて、その向こう側にあるほんとうの人間の姿を捉えようとしているんじゃないのか……そしてそこに人間の社会を見つめているんじゃないのか。だから、ある意味では、仮面は鏡でもある。ときにはそこにドラマが写り、また別の時にはコミカルな情景が写る。でも、それがぜんぶフィクションじゃなくて本物なんだ。それがすごいと思う。Interview to YAMAMURA – (Yamamura’s wife), by Y.Hosoya & L.Pellegatta

TWODOGS
Share